Birds - 'data file'

Introduction

 

My personal record of birds seen and photographed in the wild currently totals around 890 species. Not only do I want to ensure that all of those species are correctly identified and named, but I also need a robust cataloguing system for organising the thousands of photos within my Lightroom (Lr) library module. All my photos are stored by year and location, so to quickly access images of a given species I must rely on a well organised keyword system and, for me, the most sensible and logical way of achieving this is to put related keywords into defined categories. That's all well and good all the time the system is of a manageable size, but as the list of species grows and more categories, which are effectively groups of similar species, are needed, better organisation is required. I was at that stage a few years ago and knew that I had to completely restructure my keyword lists before the whole system became a mess. Birds were my priority because, although I was going to have to carry out a similar exercise with my animal keywords, the list of bird species together with associated references was already very large. A good hierarchical filing system was needed where related species could be grouped together with similar groups, or families, all under as few primary categories as possible. The system needed to be structured to roughly follow the normal systematic order for listing bird species, so I knew that I would have to broaden my knowledge.

It was all a bit of a mystery at the outset, but the more I delved into the world of avian taxonomy the more it started to make sense, to the point that I now feel I have a reasonable understanding of the subject. The biggest problem I found wasn't to do with the naming of species, but with the classification system itself as I couldn't find two bird lists that agreed with each other. I found that quite frustrating as the systematics and classification was just as important as the nomenclature. In the end I had so many notes that I decided to write a couple of articles - the first was 'understanding bird orders and families', which was followed up with an accompanying piece entitled 'understanding taxonomy listings'. They were on my original website, but as both documents are still relevant to some degree I've made them available at the bottom of this page.  

 

The exercise helped me develop a very workable Lr keyword system. A system that's been slowly developed and adapted over the last few years as I've encountered new species. It currently has 26 primary bird groups, many of which are broken down into various subgroups. Whilst there are far too many of these associated subgroups and nested keywords to list on a web page like this, I have confirmed all the primary groups for reference purposes.

However, whilst my Lightroom keyword system works for finding photos of a given species, my personal 'World Bird List', that I regularly update, requires a different approach. The system that works for me is an 'excel workbook' that is split into eight spreadsheets (categories) for 'waterfowl', 'waterbirds', 'shorebirds', 'seabirds', 'raptors & owls', 'miscellaneous', 'exotic birds' and 'passerines'. Each species is listed under its family group by taxonomic order and family and, if appropriate, subfamily and tribe. The species is identified by both its common and scientific name, and its trinomal subspecies name if defined. If the species is categorised as 'threatened' on the IUCN Red List I have marked it accordingly. The list also shows the country where each species or subspecies has been photographed.

Whilst the buttons on the right will take you directly down the page to that particular section, it makes sense to start with the systematic ordering of species, which is classification.

 

Important :

Please note that this 'data file' page is best viewed on a desktop monitor or laptop screen. Whilst the following lists have been optimised as much as possible for mobile use, the columns cannot be compressed within the width of a mobile screen. Consequently, the 'taxonomic order' column has been omitted to enable the 'family' and 'species' information to be viewed side by side. Additionally, some of the 'species' names run off the page, which can't be avoided. 

Classification

 

Based on the latest data from the IOC (International Ornithological Congress), there are now over 10,700 listed bird species, split into 250 families and 40 orders. Given that my 890 or so photographed species represents well under 10% of that total it's not surprising that some bird orders and families don't concern me as I'm never likely to reference them. Of the 250 bird families 109 relate to non-passerine species in 39 of the 40 orders, with the remaining 141 families in PASSERIFORMES. The following list shows every order together with all 109 non-passerine families, and a selected list of all the passerine families that feature on my personal 'World Bird List'.

It's a simple, but very useful list.

Section 1 - Non-passerines (a complete listing of all 109 families as IOC v9.2 - June 19)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

STRUTHIONIFORMES

RHEIFORMES

APTERYGIFORMES

CASUARIIFORMES

TINAMIFORMES

ANSERIFORMES

GALLIFORMES

 

GAVIIFORMES

SPHENISCIFORMES

PROCELLARIIFORMES

 

PODICIPEDIFORMES

PHOENICOPTERIFORMES

PHAETHONTIFORMES

CICONIIFORMES

PELECANIFORMES

 

SULIFORMES

ACCIPITRIFORMES

OTIDIFORMES

MESITORNITHIFORMES

CARIAMIFORMES

EURYPYGIFORMES

GRUIFORMES

CHARADRIIFORMES

PTEROCLIDIFORMES

COLUMBIFORMES

OPISTHOCOMIFORMES

MUSOPHAGIFORMES

CUCULIFORMES

STRIGIFORMES

CAPRIMULGIFORMES

APODIFORMES

COLIIFORMES

TROGONIFORMES

LEPTOSMIFORMES

CORACIIFORMES

BUCEROTIFORMES

PICIFORMES

FALCONIFORMES

PSITTACIFORMES

Family

Struthionidae

Rheidae

Apterygidae

Casuarlidae

Dromalidae

Tinamidae

Anhimidae

Anseranatidae

Anatidae

Megapodiidae

Cracidae

Numididae

Odontophoridae

Phasianidae

 

Gaviidae

Spheniscidae

Oceanitidae

Diomedeidae

Hydrobatidae

Procellariidae

 

Podicipedidae

Phoenicopteridae

Phaethontidae

Ciconiidae

Threskiorithidae

Ardeidae

Scopidae

Balaenicipitidae

Pelecanidae

 

Fregatidae

Sulidae

Phalacrocoracidae

Anhingidae

Cathartidae

Sagittariidae

Pandionidae

Accipitridae

Otididae

Mesitornithidae

Cariamidae

Rhynochetidae

Eurypygidae

Sarothruridae

Heliornithidae

Rallidae

Psophilidae

Gruidae

Aramidae

Turnicidae

Burhinidae

Chionidae

Pluvianellidae

Haematopodidae

Dromadidae

Ibidorhynchidae

Recurvirostridae

Charadriidae

Pluvianidae

Rostratulidae

Jacanidae

Pedionomidae

Thinocoridae

Scolopacidae

Glareolidae

Laridae

Stercorariidae

Alcidae

Pteroclidae

Columbidae

Opisthocomidae

Musophagidae

Cuculidae

Tytonidae

Strigidae

Podargidae

Steatornithidae

Nyctibiidae

Caprimulgidae

Aegothelidae

Hemiprocnidae

Apodidae

Trochilidae

Coliidae

Trogonidae

Leptosmidae

Coraciidae

Bracchypteraciidae

Alcedinidae

Todidae

Momotidae

Meropidae

Upupidae

Phoeniculidae

Burcorvidae

Bucerotidae

Galbulidae

Bucconidae

Capitonidae

Semnornithidae

Ramphastidae

Megalaimidae

Lybiidae

Indicatoridae

Picidae

Falconidae

Strigopidae

Cacatuidae

Psittacidae

Psittaculidae

Species

Ostriches

Rheas

Kiwis

Cassowaries

Emu

Tinamous

Screamers

Magpie Goose

Ducks, Geese, Swans

Megapodes

Chachalacas, Guans, Currassows

Guineafowl

New World Quail

Pheasants and allies

Loons (Divers)

Penguins

Austral Storm Petrels

Albatrosses

Northern Storm Petrels

Petrels & Shearwaters

Grebes

Flamingoes

Tropicbirds

Storks

Ibises, Spoonbills

Herons, Egrets, Bitterns

Hamerkop

Shoebill

Pelicans

Frigatebirds

Gannets, Boobies

Cormorants, Shags

Anhingas & Darters

New World Vultures

Secretarybird

Osprey

Eagles, Hawks, Kites, Vultures

Bustards

Mesites

Seriemas

Kagu

Sunbittern

Flufftails

Finfoots

Rails, Crakes, Coots

Trumpeters

Cranes

Limpkin

Buttonquail

Thick-Knees & Stone-curlews

Sheathbills

Magellanic Plover

Oystercatchers

Crab Plover

Ibisbill

Stilts & Avocets

Plovers & Lapwings

Eqyptian Plover

Painted-snipes

Jacanas

Plains-wanderer

Seedsnipes

Sandpipers, Snipes

Coursers & Pratincoles

Gulls, Terns, Skimmers

Skuas

Auks

Sandgrouse

Pigeons & Doves

Hoatzin

Turacos

Cuckoos

Barn Owls

Typical Owls

Frogmouths

Oilbird

Potoos

Nightjars

Owlet-nightjars

Treeswifts

Swifts

Hummingbirds

Mousebirds

Trogons

Cuckoo-Roller

Rollers

Ground Rollers

Kingfishers

Todies

Motmots

Bee-eaters

Hoopoes

Wood Hoopoes

Ground-Hornbills

Hornbills

Jacamars

Puffbirds

New World Barbets

Toucan Barbets

Toucans

Asian Barbets

African Barbets

Honeyguides

Woodpeckers

Caracaras, Falcons

New Zealand Parrots

Cockatoos

African & New World Parrots

Old World Parrots

 

Section 2 - Passerines (an abridged and personal selected list of 54 of the 141 families)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

PASSERIFORMES

Neotropical Suboscines :

 

 

Oscines (songbirds) :

 

Family

Furnariidae

Thamnophilidae

Tyrannidae

Cotingidae

Pipridae

Tityridae

Platysteiridae

Malaconotidae

Vangidae

Laniidae

Oriolidae

Dicruridae

Monarchidae

Corvidae

Paridae

Remizidae

Panuridae

Alaudidae

Pycnonotidae

Hirundinidae

Cettiidae

Aegithalidae

Phylloscopidae

Acrocephalidae

Donacobiidae

Cisticolidae

Timaliidae

Sylviidae

Regulidae

Troglodytidae

Polioptilidae

Sittidae

Certhiidae

Mimidae

Sturnidae

Buphagidae

Turdidae

Muscicapidae

Cinclidae

Nectariniidae

Passeridae

Ploceidae

Estrildidae

Viduidae

Prunellidae

Motacillidae

Fringillidae

Calariidae

Emberizidae

Passerellidae

Icteridae

Parulidae

Cardinalidae

Thraupidae

Species

Ovenbirds & Woodcreepers

Antbirds

Tyrant Flycatchers

Cotingas

Manakins

Tityras

Wattle-eyes

Bushshrikes

Helmetshrikes

Shrikes

Old World Orioles

Drongos

Monarchs

Crows, Jays

Tits

Penduline Tits

Bearded Tit (Reedling)

Larks

Bulbuls

Swallows & Martins

Cettia Bush Warblers

Bushtits

Leaf Warblers

Reed Warblers

Black-capped Donocobius

Cisticolas

Babblers

Sylvia Warblers

Goldcrests

Wrens

Gnatcatchers

Nuthatches

Treecreepers

Mockingbirds

Starlings & Mynas

Oxpeckers

Thrushes

Old World Flycatchers,

including Chats & Wheatears

Dippers

Sunbirds

Old World Sparrows

Weavers

Waxbills & Estrilid Finches

Indigobirds & Whydahs

Accentors

Wagtails, Pipits & Longclaws

Finches

Snow Buntings

Buntings

New World Sparrows

New World Blackbirds

New World Warblers

Cardinals

Tanagers

World Bird List

 

 

I previously referenced the fact that my personal 'World Bird List' is on an excel spreadsheet that's broken down into eight convenient sections. These sections group related species together or, particularly in respect of the 'miscellaneous' and 'exotic birds' categories, place species where I can find them, regardless of their taxonomic sequence. Perhaps the most obvious example is Caracaras and Falcons, which are raptors and as such should logically be listed alongside all the other raptors, such as Eagles, Hawks, Kites and Vultures irrespective of where there taxonomic orders are placed within the formal classification listing.

Whilst my original 'World Bird List' was based on John Boyd's 'Taxonomy in Flux' checklist as it was the most current and readily accessible on-line system at the time, I switched to the IOC (International Ornithological Congress) list as soon as the BTO (British Trust for Ornithology) announced that it would become the formally accepted UK list from January 2018. The IOC list is reviewed and updated every six months. I try to keep my records in line, but at the same time I am conscious that the IOC are, by their own admission, somewhat conservative in respect of changes and, therefore, are sometimes lagging behind some of the other authorities, particularly 'Taxonomy in Flux'. The situation can create anomalies, so although I will always reference the IOC list I will, on occasions, supplement or deviate from it if appropriate. Fortunately these anomalies are rarely associated with the species name (common or scientific) or indeed the species family, as they're more to do with the taxonomic order. There are, however, a couple of specific situations where the IOC's treatment of this higher level taxon can cause confusion and where that occurs I have made a comment both in the following tables, but also on the associated pages of my 'World Bird List'.

Waterfowl  (IOC sequence)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

ANSERIFORMES

PODICIPEDIFORMES

GRUIFORMES

Family

Anhimidae

Anatidae

Podicipedidae

Heliornithidae

Rallidae

Species

Screamers

Ducks, Geese, Swans

Grebes

Finfoots

Rails, Crakes, Coots, Gallinules

On my local lakes and ponds I often see Grebes, Coots and Moorhens with the Ducks, Geese and Swans and, consequently, it makes sense to me to keep all these species together on my bird list. I also don't want to split family groups from their respective taxonomic orders more than is necessary, so that's why Screamers, Finfoots, Rails, Crakes and Gallinules are also in this category. Ideally I would have liked to have separated the 'seaducks' from Anatidae and moved them to Seabirds as noted below, but decided to leave them with the freshwater ducks to avoid confusion.

Large Waterbirds  (IOC sequence)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

CICONIIFORMES

PELECANIFORMES

 

 

 

 

GRUIFORMES

PHOENICOPTERIFORMES

EURYPYGIFORMES

Family

Ciconiidae

Threskiorithidae

Ardeidae

Scopidae

Balaenicipitidae

Pelecanidae

Gruidae

Aramidae

Phoenicopteridae

Eurypygidae

Species

Storks

Ibises, Spoonbills

Herons, Egrets, Bitterns

Hamerkop

Shoebill

Pelicans

Cranes

Limpkin

Flamingoes

Sunbittern

Bearing in mind that I want as few categories as possible, I think that this collection of waterbirds is reasonably well defined even though there would be arguments to separate certain species. I have more concerns about PELECANIFORMES as it was the inconsistent use of this particular taxonomic order that made me realise that avian taxonomy isn't an exact science! How can it be when the IOC continue to place the Ibises & Spoonbills and Heron, Egrets & Bitterns with Pelicans and the Hamerkop, when other authorities have separated them into their own orders PLATALEIFORMES and ARDEIFORMES respectively? My 'World Bird List' is now based on the IOC structure, but makes reference to the alternative orders. At present I only use the classification system for organisational purposes, not for keywording. When, or should I say if, there is ever a universal agreement I will add the taxonomic order as a keyword, but for now I'm happy to group species under their family and forget about the higher level taxon.

Shorebirds & Waders  (an adjusted IOC based list)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Dromadidae

Pluvialidae [§]

Charadriidae

Haematopidae

Scolopacidae [§]

Rostratulidae

Recurvirostridae

Burhinidae

Jacanidae

Glareolidae

Species

Crab Plover

Golden Plovers

Plovers & Lapwings

Oystercatchers

Typical Waders

Painted-snipes

Stilts & Avocets

Thick-knees & Stone-curlews

Jacanas

Pratincoles & Coursers

This is a large and diverse taxonomic order with more families than any other non-passerine group. Reference to the full IOC classification listing above shows that there are seven families that I haven't needed to reference, simply because I have not seen or photographed any of those related species. It will also be seen that I've put the families I am interested in into a different and, for me, more logical sequence. I have also added the family Pluvialidae [§], which IOC do not currently use, as that family was on my original list based on the 'Taxonomy in Flux' system.  The other point is that I've referenced Scolopacidae [§] as 'Typical Waders' rather than 'Sandpipers, Snipes' as IOC. The reason is that Scolopacidae is a large family that's split down into a number of subfamilies. My 'World Bird List' separates the species into the following family groups - Turnstones, Calidrids, Phalaropes, Sandpipers, Shanks, Other Waders, Curlews, Godwits and Snipes, which is why I feel that 'Typical Waders' seems more appropriate. I've always found it a bit strange that Pratincoles & Coursers are related and grouped with the more typical shorebird species, because in my ignorance I would probably have put Coursers with Bustards!

Seabirds  (generally as IOC, but resequenced into a more logical order)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

CHARADRIIFORMES

PROCELLARIIFORMES

PHAETHONTIFORMES

SULIFORMES

GAVIIFORMES

SPHENISCIFORMES

Family

Laridae

Stercorariidae

Alcidae

Oceanitidae

Procellariidae

Diomedeidae

Phaethontidae

Fregatidae

Sulidae

Phalacrocoracidea

Anhingidae

Gaviidae

Spheniscidae

Species

Gulls, Terns, Skimmers

Skuas

Auks

Austral or Southern Storm Petrels

Fulmarine Petrels & Shearwaters

Albatrosses

Tropicbirds

Frigatebirds

Gannets & Boobies

Cormorants & Shags

Anhingas & Darters

Divers (Loons)

Penguins

Apart from the fact that the taxonomic orders are virtually in reverse sequence to the IOC list, I would like to have included 'seaducks' with Divers rather than leaving them in their Anatinae subfamily tribe Mergini. My Lr keyword system links the two groups and I was tempted to follow that logic here, but it would have confused the Ducks listing. I also considered placing the seven species of 'seaduck' that I've photographed under both Waterfowl and Seabirds, but that would have caused even more confusion, so for the purpose of my 'World Bird List' I've followed normal convention.

Raptors & Owls  (including Potoos and Nightjars for convenience)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

ACCIPITRIFORMES

 

FALCONIFORMES

STRIGIFORMES

CAPRIMULGIFORMES

Family

Sagittariidae

Pandionidae

Accipitridae

Cathartidae [§]

Falconidae

Tytonidae

Strigidae

Nyctibiidae

Caprimulgidae

Species

Secretarybird

Osprey

Eagles, Hawks, Kites, Vultures [§]

New World Vultures

Falcons & Caracaras

Barn Owls

Typical Owls

Potoos

Nightjars & Nighthawks

Without referring to the importance of subfamilies, there are three specific aspects of this category that need to be confirmed. The first, as the earlier example, is that all the ACCIPITRIFORMES and FALCONIFORMES species are diurnal 'birds of prey', or raptors to use the broader term, so for the purpose of a bird list should be grouped together. The second is that family Accipitridae includes over 250 species, 16 of which are classed as African or Old World Vultures. However, the 7 species of New World Vulture are placed in their own family Cathartidae [§].  IOC separate these species, whereas I keep them together. Furthermore, IOC do not currently recognise the relatively new order CATHARTIFORMES, which I have used on my 'World Bird List'. The final note is that Potoos and Nightjars & Nighthawks have been tucked under Owls purely for convenience. I fully appreciate that they're completely different species, but they are all primarily nocturnal birds. 

Miscellaneous Birds  (the first of two mixed collections)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

STRUTHIONIFORMES

RHEIFORMES

TINAMIFORMES

GALLIFORMES

 

PTEROCLIDIFORMES

OTIDIFORMES

CARIAMIFORMES

COLUMBIFORMES

OPISTHOCOMIFORMES

MUSOPHAGIFORMES

CUCULIFORMES

Family

Struthoidae

Rheidae

Tinamidae

Cracidae

Numididae

Odonotophoridae

Phasianidae

Pteroclidae

Otididae

Cariamidae

Columbidae

Opisthocomdae

Musophagidae

Cuculidae

Species

Ostrich

Rheas

Tinamous

Chachalacas, Guans, Currasows

Guineafowl

New World Quail

Pheasants and allies

Sandgrouse

Bustards

Seriemas

Pigeons & Doves

Hoatzin

Turacos

Cuckoos

Whilst this is a mixed bag of species, the taxonomic sequence, apart from Sandgrouse which I've placed below Phasianidae (Pheasants and allies - including Grouse), is generally as the IOC list.

Exotic Birds  (the second mixed collection)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

APODIFORMES

COLIIFORMES

TROGONIFORMES

CORACIIFORMES

 

BUCEROTIFORMES

PICIFORMES

PSITTACIFORMES

Family

Trochilidae

Coliidae

Trogonidae

Coraciidae

Alcenidae

Momotidae

Meropidae

Upupidae

Phoeniculidae

Burcorvidae

Bucerotidae

Ramphastidae

Galbulidae

Capitonidae

Lybiidae

Indicatoridae

Picidae

Psittacidae

Psittaculidae

Species

Hummingbirds

Mousebirds

Trogons

Rollers

Kingfishers

Motmots

Bee-eaters

Hoopoes

Wood Hoopoes

Ground-Hornbills

Hornbills

Toucans

Jacamars

New World Barbets

African Barbets

Honeyguides

Woodpeckers

African & American Parrots

Old World Parrots

One person's interpretation of what constitutes an 'exotic bird' will often be different from another person's view, but personally I think most of these family groups meet the criteria to some degree.

Passerines  (a selected and adapted IOC based list)

TAXONOMIC ORDER

PASSERIFORMES

> TYRANNI

(Neotropical Suboscines)

 

 

> PASSERI

(Oscines - songbirds)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family

Furnariidae

Thamnophilidae

Tyrannidae

Cotingidae

Pipridae

Tityridae

Platysteiridae

Malaconotidae

Vangidae

Laniidae

Oriolidae

Dicruridae

Monarchidae

Corvidae

Alaudidae

Hirundinidae

Paridae

Remizidae

Panuridae

Aegithalidae

Pycnonotidae

 

Cisticolidae

Cettiidae

Phylloscopidae

Acrocephalidae

Sylviidae

Parulidae

Donacobiidae

Timaliidae

 

Polioptilidae

Sittidae

Certhiidae

Regulidae

Troglodytidae

Mimidae

Sturnidae

Buphagidae

Turdidae

Muscicapidae

Cinclidae

Nectariniidae

Passeridae

Prunellidae

Ploceidae

Estrildidae

Viduidae

Motacillidae

Fringillidae

Calariidae

Emberizidae

Passerellidae

Icteridae

 

Cardinalidae

Thraupidae

Species

Ovenbirds & Woodcreepers

Antbirds

Tyrant Flycatchers

Cotingas

Manakins

Tityras

Wattle-eyes

Bushshrikes

Helmetshrikes

Shrikes

Old World Orioles

Drongos

Monarchs

Crows, Jays & Magpies

Larks

Swallows & Martins

Tits

Penduline Tits

Bearded Tit (Reedling)

Bushtits

Bulbuls

 

Cisticolas

Cettia Bush Warblers

Leaf Warblers

Reed Warblers

Sylvia Warblers

New World Warblers

Black-capped Donocobius

Babblers

 

Gnatcatchers

Nuthatches

Treecreepers

Goldcrests

Wrens

Mockingbirds

Starlings & Mynas

Oxpeckers

Thrushes

Old World Flycatchers,

including Chats & Wheatears

Dippers

Sunbirds

Old World Sparrows

Accentors

Weavers

Waxbills & Estrilid Finches

Indigobirds & Whydahs

Wagtails, Pipits & Longclaws

Finches

Snow Buntings

Buntings

New World Sparrows

New World Blackbirds

 

Cardinals

Tanagers

I found this particular list for recording Passerine species that I've photographed the most difficult to compile simply because, whilst I wanted to keep it as close as possible to the formal taxonomic sequence, I also wanted to ensure that, what I call, related species (Shrikes, Tits, Warblers etc), were listed together irrespective of their classification order. This is my biggest list with around 300 species in 54 of 141 families and, as a non-birder, I had to make sure that it was structured in such a way that I could find the species I struggle with.  For example, remembering the Eurasian Blackcap is a Sylvia Warbler, Wheatears come under Old World Flycatchers, Redpolls and Siskins are Finches, whilst New World Finches are classed as Tanagers.       

Adobe Lightroom Keywords

 

 

The following list confirms the 26 primary keyword headings that I use in Lightroom. Some categories, such as Flamingos and Penguins for example, are very simple as they only contain a couple of species. However, other categories, notably waterfowl, waterbirds, shorebirds, seabirds, birds of prey, and passerines are more involved and, as such, contain various nested keyword groups :-​​

  • Ratities (Ostrich, Rheas etc) and Tinamous

  • Landfowl (Pheasants, Grouse, Spurfowl, Francolins etc) and Sandgrouse

  • Waterfowl (Ducks, Geese and Swans) together with Grebes, Moorhen, Coot etc

  • Waterbirds (Herons, Egrets, Ibises, Spoonbills, Storks etc)

  • Bustards, Cranes and Rails

  • Flamingos

  • Penguins

  • Pelicans and Hamerkop

  • Cormorants (including Anhinga and Darter)

  • Shorebirds and waders

  • Seabirds (Gulls, Terns, Auks, Seaducks, Divers etc)

  • Frigatebirds, Boobies and Gannets

  • Birds of Prey (Eagles, Harriers, Hawks, Kites, Falcons, Vultures etc)

  • Owls (including Potoos and Nightjars)

  • Pigeons and Doves

  • Parrots and Macaws

  • Cuckoos and Turacos

  • Hornbills and Toucans (including Hoopoes)

  • Rollers and Motmots

  • Kingfishers

  • Woodpeckers (including Jacamars and Barbets)

  • Bee-eaters

  • Hummingbirds

  • Trogons and Mousebirds

  • Passerines (Neotropical Suboscines)

  • Passerines (Oscines or Songbirds)

Understanding Avian Taxonomy

 

In my introduction at the top of the page I mentioned that some while ago I wrote a couple of articles to record some of the information I'd gleaned whilst trying to understand avian taxonomy and, although some details are a bit dated now, I would make the documents available - both as a read only word docx download file, and a pdf view file.  

 

The first article entitled 'understanding bird orders and families' looked at the anomalies between the three primary taxonomy listings - IOC, HBW/BirdLife and eBird/Clements - as they were at the time. I compared the taxonomic orders and families of these formally recognised 'world bird lists' with the latest avian classification information on Wikipedia and the "Taxonomy in Flux" on-line checklist maintained by Professor John Boyd, as well as seeing how they compared with the outdated BTO list. Whilst the original comparisons were carried out in November 2015, I updated and reissued the document in July 2017. For me it's still an interesting read.    

The second, follow up document, which I called 'understanding taxonomy listings' refers to various related subject matters, including binomial nomenclature, the construction of scientific bird names, cladistics, species, subspecies and alternative ways of ranking taxons. If you're new avian taxonomy you should find it useful.

 

 

Copyright © Tony Enticknap - all rights reserved

No copy permitted without prior agreement

(associated notes, disclosures and disclaimer)